Gas emits light! Make “hot” ice! Sean Connolly delivers a STEM bang in his new book

Sean Connolly is called “the master of daring STEM books.” We can see (and read) why.

His latest tome, The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry: 24 Experiments for Young Scientists (Workman Publishing, $14.95,) turns questions like “Why does helium make balloons float?” and “How does fluoride protect teeth?” into learning opportunities. It’s a journey through the periodic table of elements with Connolly.

The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry: 24 Experiments for Young Scientists (Irresponsible Science)

Ingeniously marrying science and fun, it is a perfect introduction to chemistry for curious kids as well as those who might prefer a more engaging approach to science. It’s like having a miniature science lab between two covers.

The book puts knowledge into action using household ingredients to conduct 24 awesome, hands-on experiments, including:

  • Sodium: Make “hot ice” by crystallizing vinegar and baking soda into sodium acetate.
  • Neon: See how this gas emits light by powering a light bulb with static electricity.
  • Iron: Submerge steel wool in vinegar to see how this metal oxidizes.
  • Phosphorus: Play cat detective by using ultraviolet light to locate bad cat smells!

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