Tag Archives: Simon and Schuster

Save the date (June 19), remember the name of a hot new novel: Siobhan Adcock’s “The Completionist”

Every once in a while we come across a book that we simply love. The latest example: The Completionist (Simon & Schuster, $26), the thrilling new novel from acclaimed author Siobhan Adcock. Truly a novel of the times, and in the spirit of Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven and Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s TaleThe Completionist is an inventive, deeply human mystery set in a future that holds our own world in a black mirror.

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This impossible-to-put down novel follows an ominous near-future society in which water no longer naturally exists, birth rates have plummeted, and technology is omnipresent, even inside human bodies. A troubled young Marine, Carter Quinn, returns home from a brutal war to discover one of his sisters has disappeared without a trace, and the other is naturally pregnant, a rare and rmiraculous event that puts her independence in jeopardy. As Carter sets off to find his sister Gardner, he discovers startling truths about his society, and the terrifying implications the fertility crisis has on women, including his own sister Fred. A system meant to keep the few pregnancies as safe as possible only puts women in dire situations to keep up with impossible standards.

Willing to do anything to protect his sisters, Carter’s efforts lead him to painful realizations about his family, his society, and himself, all culminating in a stunning conclusion you won’t see coming.

We promise you will be gripped. We promise this is a perfect beach book. We promise you will thank us once you read Adcock’s tome, officially published on June 19.

Historian William Hitchcock’s “The Age of Eisenhower” is an absorbing, serious biography at its best

Historian William Hitchcock shoots straight. Direct. And his news is factual truth. Witness an expert from his USA Today op-ed, published February 12.

“The last Army general to occupy the White House, Dwight D. Eisenhower, would be spinning in his grave if he knew that President Trump, a man who used a medical deferment to avoid combat service in Vietnam, was planning a giant military parade in Washington.”

The op-ed was a well-written reminder that The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World in the 1950s (Simon & Schuster, $35) was being released; Hitchcock’s massive tome is not only an absorbing, serious biography at its best, but it could (if needed) serve as a murder weapon.

Since I grew up long after the I LIKE IKE movement was around, I never had a chance to understand what the fuss was about. Now I do.

In a 2017 survey, presidential historians ranked Dwight D. Eisenhower fifth on the list of great presidents, behind the perennial top four: Lincoln, Washington, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Teddy Roosevelt. Hitchcock shows that this high ranking is justified. Eisenhower’s accomplishments were enormous and loom ever larger from the vantage point of our own tumultuous times. A former general, Ike kept the peace: He ended the Korean War, avoided a war in Vietnam, adroitly managed a potential confrontation with China, and soothed relations with the Soviet Union after Stalin’s death.

He guided the Republican Party to embrace central aspects of the New Deal like Social Security. He thwarted the demagoguery of McCarthy, and he advanced the agenda of civil rights for African Americans. As part of his strategy to wage and win the Cold War, Eisenhower expanded American military power, built a fearsome nuclear arsenal and launched the space race.

In his famous Farewell Address, he acknowledged that Americans needed such weapons in order to keep global peace, but he also admonished his citizens to remain alert to the potentially harmful influence of the “military-industrial complex”.

From 1953 to 1961, no one dominated the world stage as did President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Age of Eisenhower is the definitive account of this presidency, drawing extensively on declassified material from the Eisenhower Library, the CIA, and the Defense Department and troves of unpublished documents. In his masterful account, Hitchcock shows how Ike shaped modern America, and he astutely assesses Eisenhower’s close confidants, from Attorney General Brownell to Secretary of State Dulles.

The result is an eye-opening reevaluation that explains why this “do-nothing” president is rightly regarded as one of the best leaders our country has ever had.

A full-dressed teen found at the bottom of her family’s pool. Dive into Mary Higgins Clark’s latest mystery, “I’ve Got My Eyes on You”

Some whine that Mary Higgins Clark is the Queen of “cut and paste”. Nonsense. Jackie Collins held that title.  Clark maintains the honor of being known as the “Queen of Suspense”.  Mary Higgins Clark remains in top form after more than 40 years of delivering hit suspense novels

Clark’s latest: I’ve Got My Eyes on You (Simon & Schuster, $26.99). What can we tell you about the page-turner? Just a bit to lure you into the mystery as we were . . .

After a party when her parents are away, 18-year-old Kerry Dowling is found fully dressed at the bottom of the family pool. The immediate suspect is her boyfriend who had a bitter argument with her at the party. Then there is a 22-year-old intellectually impaired neighbor who was angry because she didn’t invite him to the party.  Or is there someone else who is not yet on the radar screen?

Kerry’s older sister Aline, a 28-year-old guidance counselor, is determined to help the detective assigned to the case find the truth. She does not realize that now she is putting her own life in danger . . .